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  • Writer's pictureRevanth Arramreddy

The Crucial Role of Mother Tongue in Early Childhood Education and Development


The early years of a child's life are crucial for their cognitive, social, and emotional development. Language is one of the most critical factors in this development, and the language a child is taught in can significantly impact their learning and overall well-being. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of using the mother tongue in early childhood education.


Research has shown that teaching children in their mother tongue has numerous benefits. When children are taught in a language they are familiar with, they are more likely to develop a positive attitude towards learning and have greater self-esteem. This can lead to better academic performance and improved social and emotional well-being. Additionally, when children are taught in their mother tongue, they are more likely to retain information, which can help to build a strong foundation for their future learning.


Moreover, using the mother tongue in early childhood education can also help preserve and promote local culture and traditions. It can help children to understand and appreciate their cultural heritage and identity, which is especially important in today's globalized world. In addition, it can serve as a bridge for children who are learning multiple languages, helping them connect with different cultures and languages meaningfully.


It is often argued that teaching children in their mother tongue can delay learning additional languages, such as English. However, research has shown that this is not the case. In fact, teaching children in their mother tongue can help them to learn English more effectively. When children have a strong foundation in their mother tongue, they can better understand the structure and grammar of a language. This can make learning a new language, such as English, easier for them. Additionally, when children are taught in their mother tongue, they are more likely to develop a positive attitude towards language learning, which can encourage them to continue learning new languages. Therefore, educating children in their mother tongue is not a setback to learning English; rather, it can be a beneficial strategy supporting their overall language development.


Research has also shown that forcing students to learn in a language that is not their mother tongue can have negative psychological impacts on them. Students who are forced to learn in a language that is not their own may experience anxiety, low self-esteem, and a sense of disconnection from their culture and identity. This can ultimately impact their academic success and overall well-being. Studies have also shown that students who are educated in their mother tongue have higher levels of motivation and engagement in learning, as they can understand and connect with the material more effectively. For example, a study conducted by UNESCO found that students taught in their mother tongue had higher academic achievement, improved cognitive development, and better social integration than those who were not. Overall, these findings suggest that education in the mother tongue is crucial not only for academic success but also for students' psychological well-being.


In conclusion, using the mother tongue in early childhood education has numerous benefits. It promotes children's cognitive, social, and emotional development, preserves and promotes local culture and traditions, and helps children learn multiple languages more effectively. Educating children in their mother tongue can significantly impact their academic success and psychological well-being, making it an essential strategy for promoting their overall development. Therefore, educators and policymakers need to recognize the value of mother tongue-based education and support its implementation in early childhood education.

 

Sources:

  1. UNESCO. (2016). If you don't understand, how can you learn? A guide to supporting mother tongue-based multilingual education. Retrieved from https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000245681

  2. Cummins, J. (2000). Language, Power, and Pedagogy: Bilingual Children in the Crossfire. Multilingual Matters.

  3. Benson, C. (2004). The Psychology of Bilingualism. Multilingual Matters.

  4. Skutnabb-Kangas, T., & Phillipson, R. (1994). Linguistic Human Rights: Overcoming Linguistic Discrimination. Mouton de Gruyter.

  5. Thomas, W. P., & Collier, V. P. (1997). School Effectiveness for Language Minority Students. National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education.

  6. Pinnock, H., & Best, M. (2016). Why teaching children in their mother tongue is important. The Conversation. Retrieved from https://theconversation.com/why-teaching-children-in-their-mother-tongue-is-important-66545

  7. UNESCO. (2008). Mother Tongue Matters: Local Language as a Key to Effective Learning. Retrieved from https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000155107

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